Tag Archives: painting

Fasting

22 Jan

If fasting is defined by consuming certain things sparingly or altogether, then shouldn’t slowing mean the exact opposite? I mean think about it: “Yea guys I’ve been slowing now for 2 weeks and accumulated a solid 30lbs of fat”.

Maybe this is more of an inference that the English language is fairly inconsistent compared to other languages. It would seem that the resultant of mass consumption would in fact be a slowing of the body, but is better defined as gluttony, gorging, indulgence etc. The thought of fasting began circulating this morning in church service when pastor spoke about our relationship with god in prayer, faith and fasting. Fasting seems to be one of these steps that is so easily forgotten, but all I could think of was how it was tied into my current lifestyle. (Leave it to an insufficient human to be thinking of themselves in church and not the bigger picture). I was adding up all of the steps I had taken to be healthier, act as a social mediator, put more trust in the lord and realize that a concern with opportunity in the present is less important then being being patient and content. All of the physical acts came to mind: Consuming little to no processed foods, withdrawing from sluggish habits (television, youtube, sleeping in late), seeking a connection in those you care about vs. ignoring this lack of vigor in ones self as a sign of too much down time. I realize that everyone has the desire at some point to award themselves with a lazy day, go off your diet day, just to be carefree. The choice to do so often breeds a perspective of loss in self control, but what is actually ensuing here?

One might consider this a fasting of the incessant. The desire to step outside of the pressures we commit to in our daily lives. If it is enough of a window of time to relieve that pressure, we may reinvent a revitalized version of our previous objective. I apply this to my relationship with the lord when the clarity to see his vision is obscure. It is not to say that we should ignore the lord, ignore our friends, ignore our families or ignore ourselves, but if we’ve invested all our efforts to be loved by them and see nothing in return, we are not to fault for waiting for that love to sprout, flourish and reappear in a miraculous way.

Moreover when ye fast, be not, as the hypocrites, of a sad countenance: for they disfigure their faces, that they may appear unto men to fast. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward. But though, when though fastest, anoint thine head, and wash thy face; That thou appear not unto men to fast, but unto thy Father which is in secret: and thy Father, which seeth in secret, shall reward thee openly.

Matthew 6:16-18

 

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frigid, but fruitful

28 Oct

As the winter air settles day to day, flakes fall then melt off. The western New York landscape changes from vibrant foliage atop the trees to decayed lumps descending to the earth. Although events like this inevitably happen each year I can’t help but to look up at the sky and be overcome with a sense of surreality.

Within this semester I’ve become more independent and somewhat mechanical in terms of work habits. Days almost always begin habitually with a gym session from 7-8AM, a cup of french pressed coffee with breakfast followed by the choice of art history readings, video editing, or drawing/printing in my studio space.

Here are some recently edited photos of work going in my December show. The 1st is a refined frame design from last semester that consists of 3 zinc plate etchings scanned and printed on transparencies. The transparencies are then placed in thinly cut slots so their contents line up in succession of foreground middle ground and background.

The second image (photographed poorly) is a 4 layer reductive monoprint. More specifically, the image was produced using the cmkyk method and printed from an acrylic plate. The color layers are as follows: yellow, orange, red, magenta, cyan. By using a graphite drawn composition I placed it underneath the acrylic to use as a guide. Once the surface of the plate has ink applied to it I then began wiping away material and creating texture in a way that lined up as well as emulated the shape of the detail from the drawing. Mounted on top of the print is a painted poplar frame with a singular slot cut into the center. Within this slot is an 18×24 transparency of a digital print.